BLOOPZ, RN

Hi and welcome to my tumblr! I'm a new registered nurse who recently passed the NCLEX. I post nursing material (notes, diagrams, etc) that I find helpful and useful to share with others. The photographs (food and nursing related) are mine unless otherwise stated. Feel free to 'Ask' me anything or want to just say 'Hi'! Thanks! :)

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Posts tagged drugs

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Withdrawal symptoms of neonates

Acronym: WITHDRAWAL:

W- Wakefulness
I- Irritability
T- Tremulousness, temperature variation, tachypnea (respiratory cough)
H- Hyperactivity, high-pitched persistent cry, hyperreflexia (decreased fine motor control)

D- Diarrhea, disorganized suck
R- Rub marks, respiratory distress
A- Apneic attacks (temporarily stop breathing)
W- Weight loss or failure to gain weight
A- Alkalosis (abnormally high level of alkalinity in body fluids)
L- Lacrimation (excess secretion of tears)

(source:http://www.dss.mo.gov/)

(Source: bloopz)

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6 Rights to Medication Adminstration and 3 Checks

The Six Rights
When you are giving medication, regardless of the type of medication, you must always follow the six rights.
Each time you administer a medication, you need to be sure to have the:
1. Right individual
2. Right medication
3. Right dose
4. Right time
5. Right route
6. Right documentation

  • Each time you give a medication, you must systematically and conscientiously check your procedure against these six rights.
  • This is essential every time you administer any medication – including medications that an individual has been taking for a long time.
  • You must check for all six rights every time you administer any drug to any individual.
  • Each time that you give a medication, you also need to remember to do the "Three Checks". This means that you are going to do a “triple-check” to make sure that the six rights are present each time that you give a medication. You must:

1. Remove the medication from the locked area and check the prescription label against the medication log to make sure that they match: this is the 1st check.
2. Before pouring the medication, check the prescription label against the medication order to make sure that they match: this is the 2nd check.
3. After you pour the medication, but before you give it, check the prescription label against the medication log entry again to make sure that they match: this is the 3rd check.

(source: http://www.dhhs.nh.gov/)

(Source: bloopz)